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kyathil

118 Shards
Hi there! Kyathil is a gamer, programmer, streamer, cat fanatic, beer and whiskey geek! Streaming semi regularly at Twitch with dark souls style games, platformers, horror games, indie games and some multiplayer games with viewers. Stay a while and glisten! 
  1. I've been talking about it some, but I really want to open a cat café in the future! The idea is that I will take in a number of homeless kitties which will be up for adoption... There will be a small entrance fee for visitors to keep the place going, plus possibility to have something warm to drink and sweet to eat. Of course there will be a kitty cam for Twitch! The shelters are cramped and I really want to help!

    Since I've finally been able to buy a home now I will start saving up for this little dream of mine! There are a tooon of regulations to go through, plus need to find a location for the café!

    1. RabenKatze

      RabenKatze

      omg this is amazing! i hope this will become a reality!

    2. kyathil

      kyathil

      Me too! It's going to take some time, but at least I have a goal and a plan. :3 Gonna open up savings account and transfer a small monthly sum to begin with

    3. RabenKatze

      RabenKatze

      i wish you ton of luck with that, this idea is so beautiful it must happen!

  2. Greetings! It is finally October and some of us will be diving head deep into spooky and scary stuff for the entire month, which is why this month's edition of Hidden Gems will be featuring horror games Since we are all very different with what kind of scary stuff we can take, they will also be very varied in "scary factor" and hopefully there will be something suitable for all! In order to give an idea of how scary etc the game is I've added a little score to each of the game from 1-10: Scare factor - How terrified you will get Gameplay - How smooth the game experience is Story - I think this one is obvious Kaet Must Die! Publisher: Strength in Numbers Studios, Inc Genre: Horror/puzzle solving Price: 14.99€ Steam link Release Date: 2018-04-06 I've been playing a lot of horror games over the years, but not a single one has been like Kaet Must Die!... Which is to it's advantage and disadvantage. The reason I even got to know about this game was because one of the developers, who later became my mod on Twitch, talked about about this game he was developing and it sounded really interesting in my ears so had to give it a spin. The game features 10 levels that your character, Kaetheran/Kaet, must solve in order to regain her power s and memories. You solve these puzzles through various means, such as collecting items and placing them on a certain location. The more levels you solve, the harder it gets and the longer time they will take to solve. Oh, and you gotta solve the puzzles within a certain amount of time or it's game over! Does this sound easy? Well, it's not... You see, you also have a various amount of enemies, some moving and some hiding in dark places, doing their absolute best in trying to jumpscare the shit out of you and kill the protagonist. Additionally, the light sources will start disappearing, one by one, until it's completely dark and Kaet succumbs to her nemesis! There are some tools that you can use in order to progress in the game, and keep that sanity in check, such as light sources and abilities that will unlock at certain levels. There is one very negative aspect to this game and that is, if understood correctly, that it's not finished. There has been talk about adding more story and hints to the game, there wasn't a lot of those last time I played. I can definitely see how it would improve the game experience massively and I do think the price tag is a little up there for what you get. Nevertheless, the game is combining puzzle making and horror in a very unique way and I personally think it deserves a bit more recognition! I had fun and screamed a lot as I was playing, there might be a clip from a stream showing just that in the trailer below! Scare factor: 7/10 Gameplay: 7/10 Story: 4/10 The Cat Lady Publisher: Screen 7 Genre: Psychological horror Price: 8.19€ Steam link Release Date: 2012-12-01 The Cat Lady got so many things that I personally enjoy that it's going to be hard to summarise it all in this episode, don't want a large novel here. With that said I do want to point out that this game is on my top list of games, of all times, and am definitely a bit biased! I also wanna warn you that this game is touching subjects such as PTSD, rape, illness, death, depression and suicide and if you are sensitive about these topics it might be a bad idea to play the game. You follow Susan Ashworth, a depressed 40-year old lady on the verge of suicide. She has no friends nor family (but there are cats!) and no hope for the future. One day, after certain events, her life takes a rather unexpected turn (will not tell what though since it's a heavily story based game). This turn of events will let Susan meet a number of interesting characters and also lead her on a journey to recover from her depressed mind. Not only is Susan very obviously mentally unstable, but her actions and interactions with people in the game are not what you might expect from anyone and makes her a very unique and somewhat disturbing character to follow. She has some serious ghosts from the past haunting her and also faces several rather traumatising events throughout the game. The game depicts these events in such a way that it really, at least in my case, touches you deeply and I sympathised with Susan on a similar level as I felt for Senua in Hellblade. Spoiler, there might be tears shed and a need for hugs. The characters she encounters are also very memorable and unique in their own ways and quite contrasting to her nature, in sometimes funny ways. You can clearly see that a lot of effort were put into the story and character arcs! The game is divided into chapters, with each chapter featuring a number of puzzles to solve and several times you get to choose one or other action resulting in different possible outcomes in events. Additionally, there are multiple endings and thus the game offer certain replayability. It is a third person side-scrolling game with rather simple mechanics, moving Susan with right and left arrow and interacting with up arrow and choosing options using enter, you can play the entire game just using the arrows and enter on your keyboard. Graphically it is rather gritty and dark, which fits the atmosphere just fine, and with an absolutely amazing soundtrack! The only truly negative remark I have is that the voice acting is a little bit uneven and with that I don't even mean that it's uneven in performance of the voice actors, except for a few cases, but rather the volume and quality of the sound. It's apparent that the voice actors used very different equipment recording their lines and sent the files to the developers. But, honestly, it didn't bother me that much considering how the game excels in story telling and character development! Before adding the score for the game I want to point out that it is not a scary game like Amnesia or Outlast, but it is rather gory and violent... And super creepy! At several points I got completely creeped out by the events in the game and also truly sympathised with the protagonist's struggle. It certainly fits the horror theme and spookyness associated with Halloween, but without terror for the player. I really feel like I could write novels about how amazing this game is, but since we have another game to review I will cut it here and I do hope some of you try this fantastic game out! Scare factor: 3/10 Gameplay: 8/10 Story: 10/10 Creepy factor: 8/10 (some events are 12/10) Unforgiving: A Northern Hymn Publisher: Angry Demon Studio Genre: First person survival horror Price: 14.99€ Steam Link Release Date: 2017-11-27 JAG KAN... LUKTA DIG! - Random Troll I want to start off by saying that I'm most definitely biased with regards to this game since I'm genuinely impressed with what this Swedish little studio has released! Their latest game, Apsulov, is what got my attention from the beginning and I was happy to encounter more horror games released by them. If I understand this correctly, Unforgiving was released by the developers shortly after their senior year at univeristy in game development. Also, note that I haven't actually finished this game yet but it made such an impression on me that I needed it on this list! You start the game with the protagonist, Linn, being tied up in the back of a car... Kicking and trying to get the f out, as you might consider a natural reaction to this situation. Not going to spoil the game, but you will not spend the entire game tied up in the backseat of a car... Just so you know. Since the little story that I have uncovered so far would spoil a bit much, I will not write much about it but rather focusing on the gameplay and what scary factors being used in the game. After the escape of the car, Linn finds herself in the deep Swedish forests... In almost complete darkness. I'm not joking, I was going slightly insane with how literally dark this game is! Light sources are scarce and when you see them it feels like encountering an old friend. Her overall goal in the game is basically to get back to civilisation... But in this bloody cursed forest she will encounter pretty much every single scary myth you can read of in Swedish folklore and Norse mythology making her escape rather tedious. I LOVED how the developers integrated stories I read as a child into the game and even learned about some myths I hadn't heard about before! Considering how rare it is with Swedish folklore in games I can only praise this aspect. Even if it had been less well made I would have enjoyed it, being a Swede myself. Graphically, I did find the environment and mythical creatures rather well made... Sadly I can't say the same about the human characters but it also didn't bother me that much partly due to the occurence of humans is pretty rare. There are a few jumpscares, but the game relies mostly on the almost complete darkness and sounds to scare the player. And it really worked, the sound effects and music are absolutely terrifying! I've been very tense while playing despite the rather few jumpscares so far! Also, I chose Swedish as spoken language with English subtitles for the people watching but there is an English option if you want to go with that. My choice was basically because you never hear Swedish in games and I wanted to know how the voice acting is! I was pleasantly surprised, most of the times Swedish voice acting isn't great, and it made the game even eerier at times... But some lines were pretty funny, not that I minded it since it kinda broke the ice during tense situations! The controls did take some time getting used to, but I didn't feel them very clunky. Big thanks to Angry Studios that kindly provided me with a key to try out the game! Scare factor: 7/10 Gameplay: 8/10 Story: 6/10 (there hasn't been that much of a plot, but great lore!)
  3. I'm hyping this weekend like insane!

    Been feeling the need to get away for a bit and got an invite to this official LAN party to stream this weekend. Hotel, food etc all included. Will be seeing some friends that I only see during these events AND one of my favourite streamers 😄 PLUS will be getting Code Vein... So hype is just craaaazy!

  4. I feel like I got way too many things going on atm...

    Work fulltime, streaming 2-3 days a week, gym ~3 days a week, chores, kitty stuff, indie drop, friends, stuff related to the upcoming move... Gotta fix some bank related things and somehow fix $800 to afford the dental visit my kitty needs. 

    Need to cut down on some stuff, but I find it hard. Wanna do evertyhing, but if I keep this up I will most definitely exhaust myself.

    The last months have been a real rollercoaster of emotions and bad'n'good stuff... It really drains me

    1. Erik Rikochet

      Erik Rikochet

      I can't say I'm jealous. I mean. I have less on my plate and still complain. Haha.

  5. kyathil

    Hidden Gems #1

    Hi there! It's me, Kyathil, your friendly indie game reviewer/gamer. With this post I will kick off a series consisting of indie games that I personally think deserve some extra recognition! Ever since I started with indie game showcases on my channel (rip) I've felt the need to show off some of the games I tried a little bit more. Some games are really great for playing on your own, but are hard to stream (especially slower games with no voice acting). These will also be featured on my future youtube channel that I'm also working on whenever I can! Anyhow, the idea for this writer block series is to review 2-3 games per episode and keep it on a monthly basis. Without further ado, here comes the 2 games that I've chosen to start with 1. Nariri - Tower of Shirin Publisher: Another Indie Genre: Point-and-Click Price: 9.99€ Steam link Release Date: 2018-11-29 When you check out a game and think to yourself Oh gosh! It's so cute!I and it's actually super cute and not also hellishly difficult, that is Nairi! Nairi is an absolutely adorable little adventure about an upper class girl who suddenly have to leave the comforts of home and have to find her courage as she tries to return to her family. Along the way she makes friends, and enemies, and discovers long forgotten secrets about the areas that she explores. You can actually play as other characters as well, but i've only done playthroughs with the heroine so far so cannot say if the story will be any different if you choose somebody else. The art style of the game is heavily influenced by the work of studio Ghibli and, as such, in this fictional world we will not only find humans but also human-sized cats, rats, ducks and various other animals. It does feel a bit like those magical adventures aimed at children, but is also quite enjoyable by us adults too. All of the characters and environments are beautifully drawn and to further increase that magical atmosphere, the developers have added some absolutely stunning music. The only really negative aspect here is the sound made when characters "talk" (no voice acting), it sounds a bit like a typewriter which can become quite annoying after a while. The gameplay is typical for point-and-click adventures and very story-driven, but also featuring some clever puzzles. I personally enjoy this type of games when I'm experiencing less happy times and just cannot focus on more action-based games. As previously mentioned, the art is beautiful and the music is soothing... Which can really calm a troubled mind. Just be aware that some puzzles can take quite some time to solve and are not entirely obvious! My experience of the game was really pleasant, apart from that typewriting sound... Some puzzles were a little frustrating, but not near as frustrating as the last boss in Sekiro. The story was captivating enough and albeit the charactes might seem a little silly, they did fit the style of the game and thus they didn't feel off. It's not a very long game, but that doesn't make it any less enjoyable. Another positive aspect is that it's totally family friendly and I can see how children would really enjoy this game too! I hope this review did make you curious about the game and I want to thank Another Indie for kindly letting me try out their game! 2. Photonic Distress Publisher: GRIP420 Genre: First/Third Person Puzzler/Platformer Price: 3.99€ Steam link Release Date: 2018-08-03 Photonic Distress is one of the first games that I included in my monthly indie game showcases and is a puzzler/platformer featuring randomly generated dark levels. You can choose to play it in first or third person and the goal is to finish a certain amount of levels and collect 100 memory fragments... The game takes place in an internal representation of your character's conscience and after collecting all of those fragments, the character will finally wake up. There is not much more story to the game apart from that, but it does provide us with an ultimate goal. You complete the levels by going from point A to point B... But, the they are completely dark and if you are not careful you might end up accidentally jumping off a cliff. There will also be some obstacles which you have to remove by solving some puzzles. The only tool you have to get through the levels is your Photon gun, which can illuminate the dark by shooting out small colorful balls that will light up a certain area for a limited amount of time. As you progress you will unlock upgrades for your gun and provide more abilities. The levels will increase in difficulty as you progress, making up a decent challenge. If you find the puzzles too easy you can always increase the difficulty of the game, there are 4 difficulty levels - Easy, Medium, Hard and Impossible. Visually I was surprised at how realistic it was looking, considering it is the first game made by a small game development team. Sure, I did encounter some bugs and glitches... Such as NPCs walking funnily, text messages disappearing into walls and a few other things. But, most of these issues were minor and many have been addressed by the developers (yay for responsive developers!). The music was specifically made for the game and makes the puzzle solving a rather relaxing experience. It almost feels like mediation at times, at least before you get to an extra tricky level. One playthrough doesn't take more than a few hours. but the randomly generated levels and the option to select different difficulties do give a bit of replayability. All in all, I do really recommend giving the game a try if you're into this type of games or looking for something new. Granted, it's not a very complicated game, looking at the mechanics, there's not really much of a story to it and you will probably not spend 70+ hours lighting up dark levels... But, we don't always need that in games either! I truly enjoyed this game and am impresed with the level of details in it. It's also not going to ruin your economy, being set at 3.99€ at full price (and have been featured in some Steam sales!). The developers did a great job, thank you for letting me play this hidden gem! I hope you enjoyed my first episode of Hidden Gems! Next episode may or may not feature some spooky indie games just in time for Halloween... - Kyathil
  6. Game: Devader Publisher: Falkenbrew Price: 12.49€ Steam Link Release Date: 2nd of Septemer 2019 Genre: Shooter, indie Devader is a game that I stumbled upon due to one of my streamer friends (thank you, Erik!) and was approached by the developer to try it out. I didn't know what to expect from it, but could see from the trailer that it was some sort of shooter in space. It is described as an "intense 90's style twin-stick shooter" and surely it does bring me back to those good old days as I play! When you start a playthrough you can choose between four difficulty levels, from beginner to insane god mode, and the goal is to keep your base alive during up to 100 waves. Now, I haven't reached the end of my first playthrough yet but according to the game description there are 19 possible endings. Which means that there is a decent amount of replayability! You can play with either keyboard + mouse or a controller, this review was done with an Xbox controller. The waves are not going to be happening one by one until the last one, but rather are set up in sets or rounds. Each round features a boss and afterwards you get to upgrade some skills before the next round, your difficulty settings decide on how many skills you get to upgrade and what kind of enemies you will face and how many waves. At the start you will also get to choose between some aid/weapons that will make it easier to protect your base. The game itself is really vibrant and colorful, with lots and lots of explosions all over the map. The map is pretty small, but you get surrounded by enemies all the friggin time so it doesn't really bother and you don't have the time to think about many things except how to kill as many enemies as quickly as possible... And avoid getting yourself killed. Because, dying is bad you know? The music and sound effects are great and really suits the game, pumping you up for the mass slaughter of your enemies! The game mechanics are easy to learn but difficult to master, which I think is great in any game! There is a story to the game, saving an ancient civilisation from the mysterious Krin... And between the rounds you get some more information about what is happening. It's not a very deep story, but still a nice touch! Did I enjoy playing this game? Hell yeah! It's not a very complex game, but neat! Was pleasantly surprised over how much fun I was having while shooting to the left and right. If you're into this type of games, I would recommend giving it a try. It is also a great game if you don't have the time to play something for several hours... Maybe you want to just stop thinking about work for 30 min? Or, maybe you just want something which is not very deep or complicated? I might add that I haven't encountered any bugs yet so the game feels very polished! Thank you for reading and a big thank you to Falkenbrew for letting me play the game! - Kyathil
  7. Game: Rashlander Publisher: Hitcents Price: 3.29€ RASHLANDER on Steam Release Date: 6th of August 2019 Genre: Action, Indie "This game looks cute!" - Kyathil, 2019 Have you ever started a game bursting out things like "Oh gosh, this is so cute!" only to realize that the game is not only cute, but also hellishly difficult (looking at you Ori)? This was the case for me while starting up Rashlander. The game brings me back to the good old days of Moonlander, but with some modern touches such as integration with Twitch. The overall game objective is not very complicated, you have your little space vehicle that your steering through the void that is space and you're supposed to land your vehicle on a set target platform... And on the way you might encounter fueling stations, upgrades, messages and various obstacles. For each level you successfully do so, the distance might increase and/or obstacles are added to the map. Sounds easy, right? That is a very wrongful assumption! This game is by no means easy, at least for me. Even when I switched from keyboard + mouse to an xbox controller. Steering the little vehicle proved to be quite difficult and I'm embarrassed to think of how high my deaths/minute ratio must have been during my first twirl with the game. Now, I'm not very used to this type of games which will obviously contribute to this ratio... Still, my pride took a couple of hits while playing. However, I did have lots of fun while dying as well! The Twitch integration is a fun way to add some difficulty to your game experience with the viewers steering through set commands in the chat room. Which is, according to me, always a fun addition to a game. Sadly, I wasn't able to try this out myself during my first time with the game but I do hope I can give it a try during my next planned stream experience of the game! I don't think Mixer integration in a similar fashion has been added, yet... So any Mixer user that would like to see this on that platform as well, do give the developer a friendly poke! During my first play through I did encounter a few bugs, which I reported, and the developer has been very quick in addressing these! Always pleasant to see good interaction from developers of games If you feel like having a break from the ultra realistic games of today and play something simple, yet hard... I would really recommend giving Rashlander a try. It's easy to over complicate things in games and we sometimes forget that less is, sometimes, more! I really had a fun experience with it and will jump back to it very soon! - Kyathil
  8. Game: This War of Mine Publisher: 11 bit studios Price: 3.99EU This War of Mine - Fading Embers (requires original game to play) Release Date: 6th of August 2019 (original 14th of November 2014) “In modern war... You will die like a dog for no good reason.” - Ernest Hemingway This War of Mine is not exactly a new game, released in 2014 by 11 Bit Studios, but it’s been gaining new popularity recently through the efforts of Humble Bundle and Epic as well as by releasing the last DLC - Fading Embers. Aside from Fading Embers, there are also two previously released DLCs and an expansion pack… All released in such a time interval that it would put the game back on the radar, attract new players and put up some fresh content. This strategy alone deserves a remark, because it is truly cleverly done! It’s not very common for an indie game to stay relevant after five years since the initial release. As you boot up the game you are greeted with the famous quote by Ernest Hemingway, which is quite fitting since you will most likely die a number of times while playing! The game has three different modes - survival, custom and stories. Survival and custom mode are basically the same game experience, the difference is that you can increase/decrease difficulty in your customized games while the survival mode follows pretty much the same pattern. You start the game with 1-4 survivors in what is basically a ruined house and with a single mission - to survive until the war is over. This can be quite hard and full of moral choices! Game Core The core of the game is essentially the same in all game modes, including the story modes. You need to survive until the war is over and survival is rough. Surviving the war involves securing your base from raiders, maintaining the heat of your base (else your group might freeze to death or get terminally ill), keep your residents away from crippling depression, feed your residents and avoid getting killed during scavenging. There is a day and night mode, where in the day mode you will have control over your group inside the base and during the night you can put one character out on scavenging while the rest will either be put on guard or allowed to sleep. You will always start the scenarios in the base, where you will be able to find some basic materials to use for creating necessary things such as a stove or a bed. The focus during day time is to improve your base, create tools needed for scavenging and take care of your residents with meals and medicine. There will be visitors appearing from time to time, such as a trader, and I would strongly recommend checking when they are usually appearing before you jump into night mode! Also, the game only saves during day mode, there is no quick save! Scavenging is essential for surviving, to find materials in order to build essential tools and structures as well as finding food, medicine, bandages and weapons. There are traders, but the most essential items are very expensive and the prices may increase during the scenario. You can only put one character on scavenging per night and apart from finding materials and other loot you might also find hostiles or traders lurking around. What areas are available per run is random and some areas might have randomised features which increases replayability! The characters got a limited inventory and the areas got limited materials, which means that you will have to prioritise what to bring back to the base. While out scavenging you might see scribbles on walls Fuck the war! and various notes, items, and even bodies, signifying what bullshit the people have been through. Moral Decisions What would you do in order to survive? Would you steal? Maybe even kill? Could you refuse giving medicine to save a dying mother and her children to guarantee your own survival? These are very real questions in This War of Mine and perhaps what also lead myself to spend over 55 hours playing it. Because there will be situations, both in the standard modes and stories, where you will have to do something that will most likely leave a bitter aftertaste or even break your heart.The decisions you make will have a much larger impact in the stories (if you play them, prepare for an emotional ride). Characters The characters of This War of Mine all got different back stories, perks and addictions. Keeping an eye on their addictions is a good idea to keep depression at bay and some characters are better suited for certain tasks than others. For example there is one character that is great at cooking and another that is more quiet than others while sneaking (which might be a good perk for scavenging). Some characters might be less affected by morally debatable decisions, such as stealing from an elderly couple, than others. Depending on how you choose to play each scenario, the characters will have different epilogues after the war is finally over. Story mode In each episode you will follow the protagonist’s story during the ongoing war. There are three episodes available - Father’s Promise, The Last Broadcast and Fading Embers. While the first one follows a very linear story, the other two offers more choices, and consequences, and have multiple possible endings. All of the stories are a bit more difficult versus the standard modes, except perhaps if you choose to create a completely mad custom scenario. There are less resources available, less playable characters and more bad stuff happening. My very unbiased opinion is that it’s really during these stories that you feel how much war sucks and where the game truly shines! Fading Embers The very last episode of This War of Mine (I’m not sad, you are!) starts with a man walking through a snow storm… It’s slow, tedious, and after some time he arrives at a house and stumbles through the door… Inside, our protagonist Anja was minding her own business but takes the strange man inside and is determined to ensure the man’s survival. Ensuring the survival of both proves to be quite the task and I had to start all over after some time due to getting all characters terminally ill (gg)! That snow storm makes it really hard to keep the house decently warm and material is extremely scarce, which makes it difficult to maintain enough fuel for heaters. What is more important - saving lives or saving human legacy? This is the main theme of the episode, introducing collecting art as a mechanism. Cultural heritage has always had a big role in defining societies and without them, what will happen to the survivors of a war? As the episode progresses there will be multiple times where you have to make tough decisions, with often severe consequences, and it seems near impossible to not sacrifice something or someone. There are also plenty of cut scenes, which annoyingly enough can’t be skipped even after the first playthrough. It’s by far the most difficult episode to survive, which most likely will frustrate many players. I’ve played this game a fair bit and still needed a retry due to not being able to survive during my first attempt. The protagonist is a reskin of a previously existing character, which might seem lazy to some but I honestly weren’t too bothered by it. The overall game experience was the same as before and considering how the developers promised some new mechanics it does lower the rating of the DLC. Storywise it was a bit uneven, some parts and decisions were really good while others didn’t make much sense. Especially some characters behaviour and decisions seemed a bit off. I did also encounter a few minor bugs, but they were not making the game unplayable so I think that was alright. I really, really, like Anja and most of the moral decisions (with consequences) and I really sympathised with her struggle. Compared to the previous stories I do think the story is better than The Last Broadcast, but not as good as Father’s Promise. However, it offers more replayability due to the multiple possible endings which I can appreciate (if you can suffer through the prologue and cut scenes over and over again). Considering my personal experience with the latest DLC, with the high difficulty and unskippable cutscenes, I can’t recommend it to new players. I’m afraid that new players would just get angry after dying from starvation, illness or getting shot a couple of times! Of course, you might die from all of that in the other modes too… But they are usually faster to play through and without unskippable events, which makes eventual deaths not as bothersome. Nevertheless, I would recommend this DLC to any old player. It is true that I did find some things a bit frustrating and some other things could be improved, but the general experience was fantastic! All in all, I’m a bit sad that there will be no more episodes to play, and I don’t think I’m alone with shedding a little tear as the epilogue starts rolling and it’s time to move on to other adventures. Thank you, 11 Bit Studios, for the experience that all of This War of Mine is. Until next time! - Kyathil
  9. I have so many things I want to update after vacation... Also feeling bad about the Hitchhiker's guide, but I went head deep into Kotlin and never managed to get the emulator for Android studio to work on my private PC (it's not compatible with AMD...) and since I wanted to stream coding stuff it put everything to a halt. Will figure something out!

    1. Show previous comments  4 more
    2. Edison The Fox

      Edison The Fox

      AMD all the way! I switched to Ryzen on day one and haven't looked back! Still rocking the Ryzen 5 1500X and it's still going strong!

      I had the i5 6400 before it and that was sluggish chip!

    3. kyathil

      kyathil

      Hell yeah! Ryzen 7 2700X is what I'm using

    4. Edison The Fox

      Edison The Fox

      Ryzen Bros!

      adventure time fist bump GIF

  10. Good Day! Been a bit of a hectic time for me lately, hence the lack of updates. Today we will talk about loops, if/else and a little bit about arrays. I am also planning on having my first coding stream on Sunday, 16th, starting at 7 pm CET. Expecting the lesson to be 1-2 hours or so, thought it might be a decent time for such things. LOOPS, so many LOOPS! Loops are a big part of programming languages and Java got them too, of course. There are mainly 3 different loops: the while-loop, for each-loop and for-loop. You will use either of these depending on what you need to loop over, I will show you how to accomplish the same programming task in all 3 loops with the help of an array of int. An array is basically a list of objects and in this case it will be a list of integers, aka numbers (remember that you cannot mix object types in regular arrays). In our example here we can see a couple of things. The object we are looping through is an array called... array, consisting of 9 objects (1,2,...9). The first loop we will talk about is the for-each loop. The for each loop will check a container, such as a list or an array, for certain elements (in this case it checks for objects of type int). Note that you cannot use the reference int i outside of the loop. This variable is only visible to this specific loop. In our code example the for each loop will check every element in the array to find elements of type int and then print this element to the console. The for each loop is especially good for looping through collections or arrays where you know the object type you are looking for, but don't know the length of the collection/array/container. Note that I have commented out two loops, which is useful to do for example while debugging in order to find where in the code a bug is hiding. Alright! Looping is so much fun! Our next loop is the classical for-loop. For-loops starts at certain index, in this case the index int i is set to 0. In programming we count from 0 and not 1. After the index we have a condition to check, i < array.length which checks that the index i is less than the length of the array, and as long as our condition is true the index will increase with 1 (this can be decreasing with 1 or set to something else). For every index i in our array, we print out the object on this position to the console (array[1] would refer to the object on position 1 in the array which would be the number 2 in our example). The last loop is the while-loop. Unlike the other loops, we are initializing a variable outside of the loop (see what happens if you put it inside the loop instead!). The while loop will continue as long as the condition in the while loop is true, in this case for as long as the variable i is less than the length of the array. After printing out the object, just like the for-loop, we increase i with 1. All of these loops are doing the same thing in my little coding example and they can usually be used to perform the same job. Which loop you want to use depends on the situation! I do want to alert you about creating inifinity loops, which happens to the best of us. The infinity loops happen because the programmer forgot to add a statement which will break the loop and are very common bugs in programs. IF/ELSE/ELSE IF As a programmer you will use if/else/else if cases a lot. Basically what they are doing is that they will check if a condition is true, or another statement is true, the program will perform a certain task and if not it will do something else (or nothing at all). In order to make our code a bit cleaner I removed 2 of the loops. Now, inside our for-loop we are checking a certain condition, array % 2 == 0. Wait... what? Why do we add a percentage after our array?! And why == and not = ?? Well, I actually though this was a good time to show off the modulo operator and ==! Let us break this condition down. We have the object on position i in the array, modulo 2, and the condition is that the result should be equal to 0. The modulo operation finds the remainder after division of one number by another. So, the object to the left of % , array, is divided with by object to the right, 2. If there is no remainder of the operation, it will return 0... So 4 % 2 would return 0, but 5 % 2 would return 1 (5 = 4 + 1). Great! Useful info! Now, what about ==? Well, in Java == is used to compare objects to check for equality (this is not always going to work though). This means that the object to the left of the == will be compared to the object to the right and if there is a match it will return true, else it returns false. In our code snippet we will get a number from our modulo operation, which is the object to the left, and this will be checked if it equals to 0. To write the whole operation in English: if the object on position i in the array is dividable by 2, then "I am even!" will be printed out to the console. Else, if this condition is false, "I am odd!" will be printed. We can see that it is correct through the prints in the console (1 is odd, 2 is even, 3 is odd, 4 is even... etc) So... In a if/else case we check a certain condition and either perform operation X or Y depending on whether or not the condition returns true or false! It is possible to build larger if/else cases, with more statements, by adding else if conditions too. These conditions always occur after the initial if-case and do not have any limit. You could, if you want, add 100 else if-cases in your program (not recommended though). The understanding here is that if the first condition returns false but the next condition is true, the program will perform the operation after the else if case. In our updated program we will first check if the object array is dividable is true and if not, we check if it is less than 3... Else we perform the last operation. We can see that the program works by observing the console. 1 is not dividable by 2, but is less than 3, and "I am less than 3" will be printed out to the console. 2 is also less than 3, but since the program checks for whether or not the object is dividable by 2 first, it will print out "I am even!" instead. There is another conditional that is worth mentioning, just for you to remember the phrase: switch-cases. This can be useful to use instead of those 100 if else-cases in your program! Up Next This time I haven't decided on the topic of next post... Either more about operations, for example !=, ||, and &&, or starting with Android Studio. What would you like to see? Also, cya on Sunday at www.twitch.tv/kyathil !
  11. Welcome back! In today's post I will be going through some common variable types. Be prepared, it's a pretty long and meaty post! I was originally planning on also introducing if/else cases in this post, but I think it would be a bit too much and will thus introduce that in the next post instead! Variable types Alright! Let me introduce you to some standard variable types: int, String, char, boolean, null and double. These are the variable types that you will be using pretty much all the time while coding. I will explain a bit about each one, starting off with int (and Integer...). But first I have to explain a little about primitive types. As you might have noticed, all of these variable types were written in lower case letter, except for String. This is because every mentioned type, except for String, is a so called primitive type. Primitive types represent raw values, for example a variable of type int will be storing the binary number of whatever value you set the variable to. All primitive types have equivalent wrapper classes, Integer for int as an example, that are inheriting from the Object class (Integer inherits from int) and store references to these objects... A String is actually not a primitive type, but a class referencing a certain object (hint, not a primitive string type!) but will explain this later on. Did you understand that? If yes, good job! If no, no worries... This is nothing you have to focus on. I just wanted to point these things out so that you might have a vague memory of it for the time when this information actually matters. For now though, have a coffee and rest your head! int and basic arithmetic operations The primitive type int actually stands for integer, with a wrapper class called Integer, and you can think of this type as storing non-decimal numbers. It is a bit more complex in reality, but nothing any new programmer need to worry too much about (but if you are curious, I do encourage you to check what an integer actually is). With int you can do basic arithmetic operations such as addition, subtraction and multiplication. How you do that I will show you in the following code snippets. As you can see I removed pretty much all code from our Hello World program and added a couple of new things. First of all, in order to initialize a variable in a method (there are other ways too...) you follow the pattern seen in the code: int number = 15; , which basically means that you set a variable named number of type int to 15. Don't forget ; ! Secondly, adding comments in the code that are explaining what you are doing is a good practice! Comments does not affect the program and will only be visible for the person reading the code and you add comments by using //. There is another way to comment, but we don't need that yet. Thirdly, I added 3 different ways to increase a number with 1. Not that writing number++2; will only make the compiler angry and it will also be grumpy if you would set an int to a decimal number, like 15.5. Feel free to check for yourself! Lastly, you may have noticed something different with out System.out.println (this method is going to be your best friend btw). In the previous post you were introduced to this lovely method which will print out whatever you need to the console and is a great way to make sure that the code is doing what you expect it to do (hence all the prints in the code snippet). However, this method will only accept text, or String objects, which means that we cannot simply write System.out.println("This is number " + number + "\n"); , but we will have to parse the int to a String object. There are a few methods available, but I chose to use Integer.toString(number) in this case. The + is how we put together String objects ("This is number" Integer.toString(number) will also result in an angry compiler) and the "\n" tells the compiler to start a new line (which can sometimes make the prints a lot more readable). Here I simply demonstrated how to subtract and multiply. Some division... I do recommend that you play around with this yourself for a bit before moving on to the next variable type(s), String and char! String and char A String is actually an array of char, and you can think of a variable of type char (or character) to be any single unit of textual representation (such as letters, commas, digits etc). An int can never be set to a letter, while a char can. You can initialize a char by simply following the following syntax: char c = 'E'; (you set this to any single unit, such as '1' or '*'. 'Em' will result in an error though). In order to initialize a String you will follow a slightly different syntax: String s = "Name"; (the "" tells the program that a sequence of characters will follow). It is perfectly fine to set a String to anything, even a so called empty string, but you cannot set it to a character (String s = 'E' will result in an error, but String s = ""; is fine). In this code snippet I wanted to show you what a String and char look like in code, but also what an array of char would looks like (as I mentioned, this is basically what a String is). As you can see here, there is no need to parse characters if you want to print them out, unlike int, but if you try to print out an array of char you will see something unexpected in the console. Simply printing the array will not produce any error, because what is shown is in fact a String... But it's a String of the reference to the array object and not what the object contains ('E', 'm', 'm', 'a'). In order to print out the content of the array in the example you either will have to print each element on it's own (myNameInChar[0]...myNameInChar[3]) or use the very handy String.copyValueOf(), using a toString() will not do what you want. This is a little bit too complicated to dig in right now though and will not explain the nature of arrays in this post, but it will be explained in a future post. Note that the first letter in the array was at 0 and not 1! double, null and boolean Almost done with explaining some of the basic types! You might be glad to know that this section will be a bit shorter than previous ones, since explaining everything about these types is a bit too advanced. A boolean is an algebraic notation used to represent logical propositions by means of the binary digits 0(false) and 1(true). A boolean can only be set to true or false. Using variables of this type is common if you are about to check logical expressions or statements (examples in the next post). A double is, very simplified, a decimal number and all numbers with decimals in Java are assumed to be of type double. The last type I will mention is null, which is a kind of a special flake. You cannot set a variable to null, but you can check in logical representations that a variable is/is not null. Wait... What now? You see, null indicates that a variable does not refer to any object or array... What exactly this means will be shown in the next post, since it's easier to explain it using if/else cases. As you can see you can use basic arithmetic expressions with a variable of type double too! Also, you would need to convert both boolean and double to String if you want to print out a variable of any of these types. Up next Whew....! That was a very informative post! In the next post, hopefully up in a few days, I will be getting into if/else... And maybe some loops! I hope you found this post informative and if you have some suggestions on what to add in the future, or if I should have longer/shorter posts, feel free to add that in a comment! Cheers!
  12. Let's start with pretending it's Friday... Sorry for the lateness of this post, life got in the way! Anywho, let's get into Java! Java is a well-established (and sort of old) object-oriented programming language and widely used in software. I'm not going to explain in detail what "object-oriented" means, but you can think of it as basing the language around building pieces of code in small units and then assemble them together to create a full program. A little like bricks to build a house. If you're curious, I do recommend googling on the subject to deepen the understanding (it's a bit complex to explain in a blog post). The reason why I chose Java to start with and not, for example, C is that the goal of my lessons is to teach you how to make simple android apps which happens to be using Java(or Kotlin) for the logic. The idea is that it's easier, and more fun, to learn something if you can at the same time put it in use! In this post I will be using http://www.browxy.com/ for compiling code since it's such a handy thing to use, but will be using Eclipse in the future too! FYI, you can create an account on browxy, which is free, and that will make it possible for you to save projects and code for future use. Might be good to know! Hello World! We are going to start off with the classical "Hello World!" code base which is what you're usually greeted with if you create a new project in a development environment. So, first navigate to browxy (or any other online compiler) and hit try on "Hello World !", then press start to compile the program. After running the program you will see the text "Hello World" in the Console View. What does all of these things mean? I'll do my best to explain the different parts briefly, feel free to comment if you need further explanations! public class HelloWorld { } public is one of two access level modifiers for classes, the other being package-private (rarely used). This means that the class is visible everywhere, while in the other case it would only be visible in the package the class is included in. A class is a user defined blueprint from which objects are created... Inside the class you will contain methods, variables and eventually constructors (which I will explain in a future post). HelloWorld is the name of our class, class names are always supposed to start with a big letter (note that you cannot use spaces in the names and the general naming convention is to use a big letter for where you would normally include a space: Hello World -> HelloWorld). In Java we are always starting and ending classes, methods and constructors with curly brackets { }. So... In this code example we have a class called HelloWorld which is visible everywhere. public static void main(String[] args) { } Here we have our very first method, called main. A method is a piece of code which will perform an operation in the program. You can create your own methods, use built in methods and import classes with methods from other libraries. In this case it's our own constructed method. Once again we see a access level modifier, public, and methods can have a few more access levels (private - only visible within it's class, protected -visible within it's package). void refers to the return type and in this case the method will not return anything -> void, but in future posts we will be creting methods with other types of return types. Methods are always starting with lower letters and will always contain a parentheses which may or may not contain arguments. In this case we have an argument, String[] args. String is one of the common variable types in Java, will be going through a few further down in this post. String[] means that it's an array of strings, think of it as a list. args is the name of the argument to this method, just like method names we should always start argument names with a lower letter. The so called main method is not just any method, it's the starting point for your Java application and will always follow the syntax above! You need to have at least one method like this in one of your classes in your Java application! Yes, you can have more than one class and it will be covered later on Let's go through the last bit of our very first Java program: System.out.println("Hello World"); This is a method not created by the user but already existing in the system. What we're doing is basically telling the program to print out "Hello World" to the console. You always need to use ; to call a method and "Hello World" is an argument to this specific method. Yes, you can sometimes use text as an argument to methods (or numbers...). I'm actually not going to explain this further because I think they did an excellent job in explaining everything at https://javapapers.com/core-java/system-out-println/ . Great! I will actually not cover anything else in this post, since it's quite a lot to take in, but in the next one I will be going through some standard types, how you can call on methods from other methods, what different types of variables exist and perhaps what the good old if/else case is! Expect another post soon!
  13. Greetings Emberlings! As we all know the greatest tool you can get is a towel, but there are also plenty of other tools available for those of you who wishes to dive into the coding world! In this post I will give some personal favourites of mine and also a couple of sites with great online courses. Development Environments There are a bunch of great environments that you can use, for free, while developing projects in different languages and for different uses. The pros with using a complete development environment is that you as a developer will have most tools you need to code, debug and compile in one place without having to put the time to develop these yourself (which also means a deeper understanding). The cons are that there are a bit of "magic" underneath the hood, there might be licensing issues and the build/compiling time will be a bit slower vs creating your own environment from scratch. Just to mention a few things. As a newbie within programming I definitely do recommend using a development environment at first! Might be good to add that these environments are available for Windows, MAC and Linux so you can choose whatever platform you want! There is a hickup with android development in Android Studio if you got an AMD CPU... But will cover that in a future post. Eclipse - Mainly Java/C programming, but got extensive available addons which make it possible to code in many other languages too. OBS! You need to install a JRE (Java Runtime Environment) with it! https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/ Visual Studio - Development enviroment by Microsoft. Have very little personal experience with it, but compared to Eclipse it offers a wider range of use (such as more extensive web development and app development) https://www.eclipse.org/downloads/ Android Studio - THE tool for making android apps. Features development of apps in both Java and Kotlin (which I will introduce later on). https://developer.android.com/studio Text Editors Depending on what you are developing, you might ditch the development environments and instead use a text editor for your code while building and compiling using a terminal (for example if you want to create a website using React.js). Here are my 2 favourites for these situations: Sublime (got some really sweet features to make your syntax look absolutely dashing) https://www.sublimetext.com So pretty! Notepad++ https://notepad-plus-plus.org/download Online Compilers If you're not making an entire project, but rather a shorter program in order to learn a programming language, then you don't even need any environment. There are plenty of online compilers for any programming language. They do not offer the same amount of debugging etc as a full environment, but they work well enough for learning purposes or if you want to try out some algorithm. Will provide you with a few here, but it is possible to just do a simple google search to find a compiler to use (most of them are fiiine and rather similar to each other). Java http://www.browxy.com/ https://www.compilejava.net/ C https://www.codechef.com/ide https://www.onlinegdb.com/online_c_compiler Online Courses Feeling ready to dive even deeper into the coding world, but don't wanna enroll to university? There are a lot of great online courses, even on youtube, which anyone can take. Most are not free, unfortunately, but there are free trial periods on most and discounted offers appear every now and then. A few let you code in the browser, while most are more like lectures where you have to get the tools yourself. I'm using some of these myself to learn new things! Free https://www.codecademy.com/ Pay per course (really good) https://www.udemy.com/ Subscription based https://learn.pluralsight.com/ https://teamtreehouse.com/ Until Next Time! Phew! Such a meaty post! Next post will be up tomorrow or on Friday, starting with some basics in Java. Remember: DON'T PANIC! Cheers!
  14. Greetings mortals! I am Kyathil, a Swedish programmer and content creator on Twitch. I do apologize in advance if this entry is full of grammatical errors since the clock is way to early on a Monday morning and I need about 53 more cups of coffee to function properly. The idea of this writer's block is to supplement my future programming streams, providing some "course notes" to those sessions. This specific entry is a short introduction about myself, the idea and a test on how to use this writer block function on Ember. So, what will be covered? Well, to begin with I will do a couple of sessions with the goal of making a basic android app. The reason here is that it is just so much more fun to learn something if you can put it in practice fairly quickly and android app development got great tools which anyone can use for free. But, the viewers and readers can also request topics to cover on future session... Thus, what will be covered is partly up to you! This includes the possibility of covering other programming languages/tools in the future. Will we make an app on the first session? No, I will start off with some basics in Java and some general information about programming and tips on good online courses and tools to use. It is, after all, good to learn a bit about what's going on beneath the hood before you start driving! When will the course notes be published? Hopefully before every stream, making it possible for anyone to learn a bit before the live sessions. The good ol' "read the theory and then watching it in practice" way of learning! Are you a teacher or something, or why are you doing this? No, I'm just working full time as a developer and got 2 university degrees in programming areas (and a few grey hairs thanks to that). Been getting questions about programming during streams for such a long time that it seemed like a good idea to do this partly to answer these questions and partly to give some insight in what I do for a living. When will the live sessions take place? I will post dates with every block entry, except this one, and if anything changes I will notify you on social media.
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